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Charlie Waller Memorial launches student mental health guide

Written by News

The Charlie Waller Memorial Trust has launched a new online mental health resource for university students experiencing depression or anxiety.

The free guide includes advice for students struggling to concentrate and sleep healthily, and identifies potential signs of anxiety and depression. The resource emphasises that these mental issues have similarities, and advises students to be open about their problems and feelings. 

The resource serves as a part of the charity’s #RunForWellbeing campaign, which stresses the benefits of regular exercise for improving mental health. It also encourages students to share their experiences on how exercise has boosted their mental health on social media, with #RunForWellbeing as a hashtag. 

The #RunforWellbeing initiative recognises the research undertaken by the University of Nottingham and the University of Thessaly in April 2016. The study found that physical exercise improved depressive symptoms in adolescents after just six to twelve weeks of regular exercise. 

“It can be really difficult to get active, but we want to encourage students to consider that… exercise can be really good for your mental health.

Clare Stafford, CEO of Charlie Waller Memorial Trust

Clare Stafford, the CEO of Charlie Waller Memorial Trust said: “We are increasingly receiving reports of students struggling with their mental health, particularly at this time of year, and it’s crucial that they are able to access the support they need.”

“It can be really difficult to get active, but we want to encourage students to consider that… exercise can be really good for your mental health. The important thing to remember is to speak to someone if you’re experiencing these common struggles.” 

Charlie Waller Memorial Trust is a national charity that aims to help young people with their mental well-being by guiding them to available research and expert-approved support. It was set up in 1997 to commemorate the life of Charlie Waller, who took his own life at 28 years old. The charity trains teachers and parents to recognise when a young individual might be experiencing mental health issues, and to direct them to first line support. They work with more than 40 experienced mental health experts, delivering daily training around the UK.

Last modified: 10th February 2020

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