How well do the fashion and beauty industries represent minority groups?

Tiyanna Mistry shows that, despite some positive efforts towards inclusion, the fashion and beauty industries still have a long way to go.

Tiyanna Mistry
29th November 2020
In recent years, the fashion and beauty industries have had an evolution of consciousness; there has been a significant rise in sustainability with brands like H&M shifting to an H&M Conscious Range, and cruelty-free brands like Lush gaining popularity. Yet one aspect of this consciousness remains to be seen: the industries’ relationship with diversity and representation of minority groups.

The fight for diversity and adequate representation in the fashion and beauty industries has been a long and tedious battle. There has been a long-standing problem of accurately and adequately representing minority groups that many fashion and beauty brands have yet to achieve.
However, in the past few years, many fashion and beauty companies have faced immense pressure from consumers to diversify their businesses and become more inclusive, and some of this pressure has evidently paid off.  

The Vogue cover sparked a large amount of controversy but, equally, it prompted admiration and praise from various minority groups in society that often go underrepresented

For instance, the recent Harry Styles Vogue cover. The cover, released in early November this year, demonstrated how men can be on the front cover of large magazines like Vogue and wear dresses. The Vogue cover sparked a large amount of controversy but, equally, it prompted admiration and praise from various minority groups in society that often go underrepresented. The cover is an example that fashion is finally moving forward, especially as it was the first solo male US Vogue cover in 127 years. It not only shows that clothes are for all people regardless of gender, but it also breaks down barriers in toxic masculinity.

Rihanna had recognised the void within the beauty industry and filled it. The best thing of all is she didn’t just do this for the beauty industry, she also did it for the fashion industry

The beauty industry has also drastically improved in recent years, with the rise of more brands catering to women of all shades. Fenty Beauty by Rihanna initially came out with 40 different shades of foundation, which has now increased to a whopping 50! Fenty Beauty was created by Rihanna with the 'promise of all inclusion for all women'. Rihanna had recognised the void within the beauty industry and filled it. The best thing of all is she didn’t just do this for the beauty industry, she also did it for the fashion industry. Her clothing and lingerie line Savage X Fenty has garnered a large amount of praise both on social media and off, and rightly so. The lingerie line once again has an inclusivity ethos that is embedded into the business.

During and after the recent Savage X Fenty show in October, Rihanna was met with praise due to the diversity of models – the show featured models of all body shapes, ethnicities, and ages. This is essential in the modern world we are living in to allow for the representation of every group in society.

Rihanna’s fashion and beauty lines prove that inclusivity and adequate representation of minority groups can flourish. Brands like Victoria’s Secret could learn something from our girl RiRi. Many other brands are also trying by taking steps to develop their clothing lines to show that one size does not fit all.

As much as diversity is needed and welcomed, industries need to ensure that they are staying away from surface-level topics and tokenism

But is this enough? The question is, will big-name brands continue to maintain this momentum for diversity in the industry? Can we trust them be consistent in their approach to be inclusive? These industries need to learn to be consistent in representing minority groups. As much as diversity is needed and welcomed, industries need to ensure that they are staying away from surface-level topics and tokenism.
The strides made in the fashion and beauty industries recently have been widely welcomed, yet there is still much more that needs to be done. The industries’ leadership remains at the hands of a select few individuals. So, does it fall into our hands to advocate for increased representation of minority groups in the fashion and beauty industries?

Featured Image: @voguemagazine on Instagram

(Visited 35 times, 1 visits today)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

ReLated Articles
magnifiercross
linkedin facebook pinterest youtube rss twitter instagram facebook-blank rss-blank linkedin-blank pinterest youtube twitter instagram
Copy link
Powered by Social Snap