Interview: Bloxx

I recently had the chance to have a chat with Fee, the lead singer of Bloxx, a London-based indie band who this summer released their debut record Lie Out Loud. We discussed the album, connecting with fans on social media and how you can support artists during the pandemic. Hi Fee! How are you doing […]

Dominic Lee
20th November 2020
Images: Instagram (@bloxxuk)
I recently had the chance to have a chat with Fee, the lead singer of Bloxx, a London-based indie band who this summer released their debut record Lie Out Loud. We discussed the album, connecting with fans on social media and how you can support artists during the pandemic.

Hi Fee! How are you doing today?

Yeah not too bad! Just at home chilling out today.

Awesome! So you just released your debut album Lie Out Loud, how does it feel to finally have it out?

Yeah it feels good! It's been a long time coming for us so to put a body of work out has been really cool. It's exciting.

How would you say the recording process differed from your EP and singles to a full length record?

It was pretty similar, just that we had more block time in the studio. We were actually in the studio for about three weeks to kind of tie up everything and post-production.

Were you conscious of creating a definite theme for the album and giving it its own DNA? Or do you think it's unconstructive to think of it in those terms?

I think there's a running theme of indie-pop and my experiences growing up. The record is over the space of three years so it has my writing from since I was 19 to 22. It's very personal I guess

Which songs do you think reflected that them the best on the album?

I think Changes. Changes and 5000 miles are very personal tunes for me topically. I wrote those during a break up and 5000 miles is about that person as well. It's a very interesting dynamic.

The current pandemic must've affected your plans for the album's release and touring in some way. How specifically did it affect you?

It sucks. It's ultimately ruined this year for us and loads of other musicians. I think it's had a bit of a positive impact on streaming but very negative impacts because of the fact that we can't go on tour. Touring is one of the biggest ways to promote a record and to gain traction and also to make money. For many musicians, touring is the only way source of income with merch sales and stuff like that. It definitely has affected us we kind of chose the wrong year to put out a debut record but we're taking it in our stride I guess.

Do you think there's been enough support for bands and independent venues within the music industry at the moment.

No definitely not, there's been a lack of care and consideration on the part of the government. A lot of the entertainment industry has been left out to dry and there's a lot more we could be doing but there's ways to support bands by buying merch and buying venues' merch and helping out with crowdfunding. It's important to remember that there is no live music without the grass roots venues.

How have your band been keeping in touch with your fanbase during a time where you can't go out and engage with them in person?

It's the world of social media isn't it, it's really strange. I've always kind of hated social media in a way but over the past 9 months it's been imperative to keeping in touch with fans. It's the only way we've been able to do shows through webinars and chat to everyone. It's been great don't get me wrong, there's no way we could've promoted the record without it so it's been a godsend really.

Do you think in a strange way then the bond with your fanbase has grown even stronger?

I do think so yeah, I think that's true because we've had to show a lot of our personalities and day to day lives through a phone screen. Everyone's got a lot of time on their hands not to delve into that a bit more and I think some bands have done really well with creating interactive things for their fans. We've definitely seen an increase in our Instagram engagement and giving our fans something to feel happy about in times like these is really important.

Do you think that when you're ready to go and record your next bits, that bond will benefit you?

I hope so, it's all about trying to create a safe space for fans and hopefully this age of using social media to its fullest potential will be something that carries through to the second record. I think online presence now is as important as it has ever been. Yeah I think the fans we've gained over this lockdown will hopefully carry forward and we can continue to have this bond.

In terms of looking ahead, would you say that your sound has been a process of refinement?

I'm not sure, I think we've always been one of those bands who've never been afraid to experiment with our sound. We don't wanna put stuff out that all sounds the same and we want to be a bit surprising. We've refined it in a production sense and I go a little bit more poppy with my lyrics. You aren't ever gonna get a song that doesn't sound like us but I think sometimes you're gonna get songs that have a bit of a different feel to them.

Looking ahead as well are you excited to play live shows again when that eventually happens?

Yeah totally. This year is probably the longest time in five years that we've not played a show and that's a bit crazy for us. It's been really strange but I just can't wait to get back to playing shows. I'm really hoping the tour goes ahead because I just want to play it so bad!

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