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London Education Bill protests

Written by Latest, News

Thousands of Students took to the streets of London last weekend to protest the recent Higher Education Bill proposed by parliament.

The demo was organised by the National Union of Students (NUS) hosting huge crowds of students displaying large banners with powerful slogans attacking the bill, gathering near Parliament and in the surrounding areas.

The bill includes the introduction of the Teaching Excellence Framework and the opportunity for high rate universities to increase their annual fees above the £9,000 maximum, in line with inflation.

Many students are against the bill, as higher tuition fee’s are likely to alienate students from lower income families from higher education and will plunge existing students into even bigger sums of debt. Additionally this may put students off taking degrees that result in lower paying jobs. Malia Bouattia, President of the National Union of Students commented:

“The government is running at pace with a deeply risky ideologically led market experiment in further and higher education, and students and lecturers, who will suffer most as a result, are clear that this can’t be allowed to happen,”

“This week, before the bill has even been properly debated in parliament – let alone passed – universities are already advertising fees above £9,000.”

This is not the first time this year the government has faced resistance from students. In August their decision to cut bursaries for the UK’s poorest students was met with intense criticism and protest from students around the country.

In retaliation the NUS have proposed that students boycott the National Students Survey, as it will be utilised as a metric in the Teaching Excellence Framework.

It is believed over 15,000 students and staff attended the march to protest, as the bill will affect not only student’s futures but teachers also.

The main aim of the demonstration was to demand free accessible and quality education for all.

The bill has recently progressed to the House of Lords to be discussed before implementation.

Last modified: 28th November 2016

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