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Remember, remember the fifth of November!

Written by Lifestyle

Bonfire night is one of the best autumnal British celebrations, but do you know the history behind it?

Many know that Bonfire Night marks the celebration of Guy Fawkes being caught and executed for his attempt to blow up parliament with gunpowder in 1605. But did you know, because of this, that even today, the reigning monarch only enters parliament once a year and before their entrance, the cellars of the palace of Westminster are checked. Moreover, Bonfire Night was known as ‘Guy Fawkes Day’ up until the early twentieth century when Firework companies began to re- brand the celebration of Guy Fawkes’ death as ‘fireworks night’ in order to capitalise off the event.

Bonfire Night is loved by many across the country who gather to wrap up warm and watch beautiful displays

Since then, Fireworks have been an integral part of the celebration, becoming more of an interest than the traditional burning of a Guy Fawkes dummy.  Bonfire Night  has been a huge part of British culture for the last 400 years and until the year 1959 it was even illegal to not celebrate the holiday. Such a law is taken advantage of by St Peter’s school in York, as Guy Fawkes was a former student there so out of respect the day is not actively celebrated. Nevertheless, 400 years on, Bonfire Night is loved by many across the country who gather to wrap up warm and watch beautiful displays of fireworks and eat toffee apples.

 

Last modified: 29th October 2019

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