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Review: Chilling Adventures of Sabrina season 3

Written by Culture, Reviews, TV, TV Reviews

After the exciting trailer and music video dropped by Netflix for Chilling Adventures of Sabrina season 3, a binge-watch was predicted. Full of dramatic twists and turns, it’s a paganistic, slippery slope for everyone who has ever stepped into Greendale. 

The new season kicks off with Sabrina rescuing Nick from Hell, in addition to being introduced to some fairly interesting ‘creatures.’ However, unlike the first episode, the rest of the season is anything but hunky-dory. Including Sabrina and Nick, most of the characters have a constant battle going on in their lives, which they almost win but not quite. 

To start off, step aside for the new matriarchal coven in the town folks; be it Hell or Earth! Zelda, now the High Priestess reforms the Church of Night in a world of absent God. Prudence and Ambrose in their hunt of Blackwood end up uncovering the darker and ‘older’ secrets, which poses a threat on the mortal and witch world alike. Hilda moves towards a more familial life with Dr. Cee but of course, they end up being caught in a web, quite literally. The season also introduces Caliban, The Prince of Hell to the viewers and Sabrina, who might be ‘earthly’ but is driven by the power, much like any other being. Hysterically enough, the writers of the show have slid in Daddy-issues through both Nick and the Dark Lord, which gives off more creepy vibes than comical. Lilith assumes a more guardian-like role to Sabrina but is just as exhausted of her recklessness, if not more. 

Theo and Robin, along with Hilda and Dr. Cee (oh, and Zelda as well but I’d rather you find out ‘with who’ on your own) are a nice change with a more realistic relationship representation in a mainstream heteronormative narrative.

The multitude of musical sequences, unfortunately, has failed to gain a good repute amongst the audiences as they break the rhythm of the narrative. On a brighter note, the show portrays relationships in a more practical sense, and not just through Nick and Sabrina. Theo and Robin, along with Hilda and Dr. Cee (oh, and Zelda as well but I’d rather you find out ‘with who’ on your own) are a nice change with a more realistic relationship representation in a mainstream heteronormative narrative. The guilt, shame and depressive parts of PTSD are well represented with a tormented Nick, aiming to bring to light the difficulties endured by those who deal with mental health issues. 

Credit: IMDb, Netflix

The show is loaded with surprises and tries hard to engage the viewers but ends up on a tricky note with chaos spread over like the plant people of the pagan-earth. Sabrina’s character is rather frustrating to watch, with so much potential unrealized. At one hand, mistakes are an understandable part of a teenager’s life, but Sabrina’s independent character assumes a more dangerous position here. In a way, the only character without a character development throughout the series is Sabrina, the protagonist. But with all the support around Sabrina, here’s hoping that season 4 will bring back the magic of the earlier seasons.

Last modified: 3rd February 2020

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