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UCAS reveals higher medical applicants

Written by Science

Recent figures from University and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) reported that 23,710 applications were made to study a medicine degree at UK universities next September.

The application deadlines for medicine, veterinary science and dentistry courses for the next academic year was the 15th of October. The records show a 6% increase of applicants compared to last year.

The admissions figures show a total of 18,500 UK applicants, indicating a 5% increase from last year.

The admissions figures show a total of 18,500 UK applicants, indicating a 5% increase from last year. Medicine applications by EU students have risen by 1%, with 1,680 applications. Applicants outside the EU are up by 10% to 3,530.

For the third consecutive year, English universities have continued the expansion of available places at medical school.

Newcastle University offers a five-year Medicine degree at undergraduate level. The programme accredited by the General Medical Council (GMC). The course is ranked as top 10 in the UK by The Times Good University Guide 2020.

Simply increasing numbers of medical school places without addressing some of the other financial, organisational or social problems with the healthcare system will not lead to the desired improvement.

James Prowse, Vice President of Newcastle Medicine Society

James Prowse, the Vice President of Newcastle Medicine Society, considers the increase as beneficial. He said: “Our professional association – the British Medical Association – had been calling for increases in places for over a decade and it’s unfortunate that it took this long for the increase.

I am however heartened by the rise in applications from disadvantaged pupils, as this reflects the efforts made both at Newcastle and other medical schools with widening participation to ensure our pool of doctors reflects the society they treat.”

However, Prowse also raises concerns due to the uncertain implications of Brexit on future health care. Prowse said: “International doctors are joining the NHS in fewer numbers. Large numbers of junior doctors are leaving the profession or moving abroad, in part due to a dissatisfaction with the governance of the NHS and the professional bodies such as the GMC.”

“Simply increasing numbers of medical school places without addressing some of the other financial, organisational or social problems with the healthcare system will not lead to the desired improvement.”

Last modified: 1st December 2019

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