Battle of the dating apps: Tinder vs Hinge

With Tinder and Hinge being big players in the online dating scene, it's time to debate which one reigns supreme

Maud Webster
21st February 2022
Image: Pexels Pixabay

Tinder over Hinge

I’ll caveat this by admitting whilst I find dating apps often entertaining, I’m not a huge fan and have never approached them as a genuine way (for me) of finding anything more than something casual. Perhaps this is part of the reason why Hinge - the “relationship” app, “designed to be deleted” - has never appealed.

I’ve downloaded it a couple of times… just to be hindered by probably the key issue I have with Hinge: I don’t think I’ve ever got to the stage of having a completed profile on the app. You want basically all my personal information?! And six photos of me? And you’re getting me to answer some prompts! I need to somehow workshop three captions! Responses which show I’m light-hearted, yet clever, yet funny, yet nice and oh my God I just cannot be bothered with that. 

In my eyes you can’t compete with a) the simplicity, b) the wider pool of profiles and c) the casual nature of Tinder.

Don’t discount me for this failure to engage with the platform I so critique! I think even if I could be bothered to get onto the platform I find the whole you-can-message-me-even-if-I-haven’t-swiped-on-you thing very much not up my street. I like mutual swiping. It sets boundaries. And I suppose it depends somewhat on what you’re looking for. Maybe if you’re solely looking for that one special friend, the love of your life, blah blah blah then okay Hinge could yield you better success. But in my eyes you can’t compete with a) the simplicity, b) the wider pool of profiles and c) the casual nature of Tinder.

Maud Webster

Hinge over Tinder

Hinge is billed as the dating app designed to be deleted, but let’s be clear - it’s Tinder that you should be deleting.

Unless you enjoy matching with someone who thinks drinking gin, IPAs or liking dogs is a personality trait, or enjoy the thrill of receiving a waving-hand emoji as a first message, read on and I’ll tell you why Hinge is the superior app for unsingling yourself.  

Comparing Tinder and Hinge is like comparing a pound-saver cheeseburger to a sirloin steak

Comparing Tinder and Hinge is like comparing a pound-saver cheeseburger to a sirloin steak (or a vegan sausage roll to a Linda McCartney, if you will). You can get more for your money, but the quality is just not the same. 

Hinge specifically matches you with people using its ‘most compatible’ feature. From personal experience, these tend to be people you actually share something in common with other than the fact you both breathe oxygen and have genitalia. Tinder turns dating into a numbers game. You get way more likes (unless you pay a premium) and chances of matching, but you have to dig through a lot more people with Snapchat filters plastered over their actual face before you find your dreamboat.  

Tinder and Hinge both employ an algorithm to get you paired up. There are claims that Tinder employs (or did employ) the ELO rating system, originally developed in the 1960s for ranking chess players, while Hinge boasts the use of a Nobel-prize winning Gale-Shapley algorithm. Neither of these is sexy enough for me to explain in great detail, but it's worth noting Gale-Shapley was invented to specifically solve ‘The Stable Marriage Problem’, while ELO rating is based on calculating the skill level of a player in games such as chess. 

With Hinge, you get a feel for a person’s sense of humour, music taste, things they care about

Hinge makes messaging first easy. Rather than expecting you to come up with a witty line about yourself out of the ether like Tinder, Hinge uses prompts that essentially do the work for you. On Tinder people seem to like pointing out the fact they own shit, like having a house, a car or a dog makes you somehow makes you more fuckable. There’s just a greater level of superficiality to Tinder. People mostly swipe based on pics, which lends itself to some pretty interesting results. With Hinge, you get a feel for a person’s sense of humour, music taste, things they care about, the stuff you’d hope the special person you’re trying to bag has beyond looks alone.

To conclude, Tinder sucks, Hinge rules. If you need any more proof, check out the new voice note feature on Hinge and tell me you aren’t amused.

Anthony Welsh

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AUTHOR: Maud Webster
she/they | third year architecture & urban planning student @ newcastle | co-head of culture for the 21/22 academic year

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