Branching out: Dear Evan Hansen review (12A)

A film filled with serious themes and moments, Dear Evan Hansen still manages to be an enjoyable watch

Ruth Harrison
3rd November 2021
Image Credit: IMDB
Adapted from the Tony Award-winning Broadway musical, Dear Evan Hansen tells the heart-wrenching story of an anxious, lonely high school boy, played by Ben Platt. The film is an emotional journey exploring mental health issues and the ups and downs of social media.

It begins with the tragic suicide of Connor Murphy (Colton Ryan), an intimidating and unlikable classmate of Evan’s. Through a series of events, Evan, despite barely knowing him, is mistaken for his best friend. He feels obliged to keep up the pretence to help the grieving Murphy’s but as the white lie spirals, he becomes part of their family, finding the love and acceptance he craves – and it becomes harder and harder for him to tell the truth.

Platt and Stenberg... Image Credit: IMDB

An integral part of the film was the music. It was moving with extremely emotive lyrics and passionate performances. It was particularly impressive the way the musical numbers were intertwined with the sequencing of the film so it never came across as cringey, which can be rare for a musical. Ben Platt, who played Evan on stage as well as in the film, is clearly experienced in his portrayal as his vocal performance was astounding.

Despite the tragic and tear-jerking moments in the film due to the serious themes of suicide and loneliness, Dear Evan Hansen does end in an uplifting way that leaves you feeling hopeful and satisfied. My only criticism is that I wish there was more of a resolution with some supporting characters like Alana (Amandla Stenberg) and his mother (Julianne Moore).

It was particularly impressive the way the musical numbers were intertwined with the sequencing of the film so it never came across as cringey

Whilst it did repeat some the classic American coming-of-age stereotypes like jocks and losers, the representation of mental health disorders, such as anxiety and depression, and the complexities of grief in this film were really refreshing and necessary in this modern age.

It was, at times, a difficult and upsetting film to watch but personally, the powerful, catchy ballads made it very enjoyable. Now, I’m desperate to watch it on Broadway!

Rating: 3.5/5

Video Credit: Universal Pictures
(Visited 28 times, 1 visits today)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

ReLated Articles
magnifiercross
linkedin facebook pinterest youtube rss twitter instagram facebook-blank rss-blank linkedin-blank pinterest youtube twitter instagram
Copy link
Powered by Social Snap