How the Media Romanticizes Autumn

One of our writers analyses how the media romanticises this Autumn season

Nadia Gustab
23rd October 2023
Image credit: Pixabay @Castleguard
Pumpkin spiced latte, Ugg boots, cinnamon-scented candles and cosy blankets whilst watching Gilmore Girls in a fairy-lighted room; when it comes to romanticising seasons, autumn is the clear favourite of the media.

Seemingly, Autumn is the season that manages to outgrow its incoming holiday in the media: Halloween. Sure, Winter has Christmas and Summer has vacations, yet Autumn is romanticised as the perfect combination between the hotness and coldness of the other seasons (with no allergies that come with spring!).

Autumn is romanticised as the perfect combination between the hotness and coldness of the other seasons

I asked several people in their 20s how the media romanticised autumn for them, and the answers can be narrowed down simply to two feelings: comfort and nostalgia. These feelings, however, have been developed with the media over the last decade. As new social platforms formed, the internet initially began to exult in the meme of labelling autumn as a “Christian white girl” and “basic” season. Yet, how did this change?

The answer is simple: new trends. Through the development of social media platforms like TikTok, Instagram and Pinterest, new ideas and trends emerged and were shared that inspired and invited a community of people to resurface their feelings and recognise the beauty in the fresh beginnings of Autumn. From reimagined mood boards to aesthetics, the joy of digging out your favourite sweater from the previous year and indulging in past childhood traditions and rituals, such as watching seasonal movies and going on autumnal walks with your autumn playlist playing, returned alongside a handful of cherished memories.

New ideas and trends emerged and were shared that inspired and invited a community of people to resurface their feelings and recognise the beauty in the fresh beginnings of Autumn.

According to psychologist Lee Chamber, the media romanticises the past rather than the present through autumn, as the “seasons have specific rituals and anchors that we can attach to them, which can foster feelings of nostalgia and take us back to emotions of the years gone by.”. Therefore, come autumn, from back-to-school memories, rewatching your favourite shows and movies, and repurchasing your favourite seasonal coffee from Starbucks or Costa, there is nothing quite like indulgence in your sentimental feelings and autumnal romanticisation. 

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