LGBT+ History Month: Under the Scope

LGBT+ History Month 2024 hopes to showcase the contributions made by members of the LGBTQ+ community to the field of medicine.

Jay Barber
14th February 2024
Image credit: Pixabay @naeimasgary
LGBT+ History Month, celebrated each February in the UK, serves as both a celebration of the LGBTQ+ community and as a reminder of the inequalities still prominent today.

Founding organisation Schools OUT UK have declared this year’s theme as ‘Under The Scope’, hoping to recognise the contributions made to the field of medicine by members of the LGBTQ+ community, whilst also calling attention to the healthcare inequalities that remain rampant for queer people in the UK and worldwide.

Following Schools OUT UK’s theme, I believe its important to highlight the state of healthcare in the UK. As of December 2023, the person at the top of the waitlist for an initial appointment at the Northern Region Gender Dysphoria Service has been waiting for 67 months – 5 years and 7 months. The person at the top of the waitlist for their second appointment has waited over 4 years since their initial appointment, and over 6 years since their initial referral.

Unfortunately, long wait times for gender affirming care is only one of many issues faced by the LGBTQ+ community in the healthcare system. From outright discrimination faced by both LGBTQ+ healthcare workers and patients, to a reluctance to seek treatment at all, healthcare inequalities arise from multiple avenues. Although these facts are troubling, there is hope to be found in their discussion – by bringing these issues to light, allies and members of the community alike can strive for change.

Although these facts are troubling, there is hope to be found in their discussion – by bringing these issues to light, allies and members of the community alike can strive for change.

‘Under the Scope’ also calls for a recognition of those both past and present who have contributed to the field of medicine. Sophia Jex-Blake was one of the first women in Great Britain to practice medicine, acting as an integral part of the ‘Edinburgh Seven’ – a group of women campaigning for medical institutions to accept women into their ranks. Their success led to the Medical Act Law of 1876, which allowed institutions to accept applicants regardless of gender. Sophia is also assumed to have been queer, living with Dr Margaret Todd until her death. After Sophia’s death, Margaret wrote The Life of Sophia Jex-Blake, a celebration of the woman she loved and an account of the fight of women in the medical profession.

LGBT+ History Month is a vital time to celebrate the past and fight for the future. Within Newcastle University, you can find events hosted by the LGBTQ+ Society (@ncllgbt on Instagram) throughout LGBTQ+ History Month.

(Visited 78 times, 1 visits today)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

ReLated Articles
magnifiercross
linkedin facebook pinterest youtube rss twitter instagram facebook-blank rss-blank linkedin-blank pinterest youtube twitter instagram
Copy link
Powered by Social Snap