Ozempic: the problem with celebrities using it

Ozempic has taken Hollywood by storm, creating *yet another* trend for women's bodies.

Rosie Brennan
4th April 2024
image credit: Markus Winkler, Pixabay
Ozempic: the new shiny drug creating a new body trend amongst celebrities

The drug's actual purpose is to treat adults with type 2 diabetes, but the prominent weight loss side effect has made it a new aesthetic for breeding harmful discourse on (primarily women's) bodies on social media. Many people on social media have been speculating an increasing number of celebrities as utilising the drug for extreme weight loss purposes, like Kim Kardashian, Khloe Kardashian and most recently Sharon Osbourne.

'Let's not go back to the "nothing tastes as good as skinny feels" days'

Ozempic has taken Hollywood by storm, creating *yet another* trend for women's bodies. Not only is using Ozempic probably very dangerous for the celebrities themselves, the consequences are severe. Promoting fast and extreme weight loss as an aesthetic (if I hear the words 'heroin chic' one more time, I will honestly explode) is obviously very dangerous. There is quite literally no safe and healthy way to lose that much weight in that little time.

The issue with this drug and celebrities using it is the discourse surrounding it. We see Kim Kardashian's body looking far different than usual in an interview, we become obsessed with it and we desperately want to figure out how she achieved extreme weight loss (because there's nothing social media loves more than talking about women's bodies for basically no reason whatsoever).

Star of 'The Good Place' and activist Jameela Jamil took to Instagram last year, saying "Rich people are buying this stuff off prescription for upwards of 1000 dollars. Actual diabetics are seeing shortages. It's a now mainstream craze in Hollywood...I'm deeply concerned but I can't change any of your minds because fat phobia has our generation in a chokehold.”

"there's nothing social media loves more than talking about women's bodies for basically no reason whatsoever"

Celebrity bodies should not be seen as the ultimate desirable way to look, but unfortunately, that is the culture we live in. Not to sound anti-feminist, but The Kardashians in particular are well aware of the influence they have on the discourse of body image, and refusing to acknowledge that they have achieved this extreme and sudden weight loss in an unhealthy and non-accessible way is very harmful. Of course these celebrities are not responsible for how young women feel about their bodies, but with their platform and influence comes a responsibility to avoid promoting unhealthy beauty standards.

Growing up with films like Mean Girls, Bridget Jones and The Devil Wears Prada meant that early 2000s fatphobia was just a normal part of life for many of us. Personally, since the growth of the body-positivity movement, I am far too tired to go back to those days. Ozempic and the way we're talking about it is pushing us back to the days where making Regina George gain weight was the ultimate form of revenge (because a teenage girl gaining weight was the worst thing imaginable in 2004).

"Our bodies are not something we should shape to meet a certain trend or aesthetic"

The issue with Ozempic is that is encourages this culture of treating women's bodies as a trend. Our bodies are not something we should shape to meet a certain trend or aesthetic, they are simply a vessel through which we experience life.

I, for one, am exhausted. Let's not go back to the "nothing tastes as good as skinny feels" days. Because clearly young Kate Moss had never tasted a Greggs sausage roll when she said that, and has apologised for the harm she caused with the statement since. I don't think it's too much to ask to just let women live and just shut up about our bodies.

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