Pretty Little Protests

Are PrettyLittleThing disguising their unethical practise with diversity?

Imogen Clarke
2nd March 2022
Image: Instagram @prettylittlething

February 16th saw PrettyLittleThing make their debut at London Fashion Week, with Molly-Mae as Creative Director. The ten-minute show was praised for its diverse cast of models, but this didn't fool protestors, who gathered outside The Londoner hotel, where the show was being held.

This outward show of inclusivity is just that. Outward, and for appearances only

Image: Instagram @prettylittlething

A quick look at the PrettyLittleThing website reveals models of all shapes and skin colours. Yet one can't help but feel that this outward show of inclusivity is just that. Outward, and for appearances only. With the brand being known for exploiting garment workers, both in this country and abroad. One protestor made reference to Molly-Mae's recent interview comment about "everyone having the same twenty-four hours in a day" when it came to the salaries and working conditions in PLT's factories. The comment alone can be viewed as a mistake by Hague, yet in the context of her new role at the company, for many, it cannot be ignored.

PLT Creative Director Salary: £4.8 Million; PLT Garment Maker Salary: £7,280,00; Same 24-hours in a Day

Image: Instagram @venetialamanna

'PLT Creative Director Salary: £4.8 Million; PLT Garment Maker Salary: £7,280,00; Same 24-hours in a Day.'

Molly-Mae, and the diverse cast of Fashion Week models are on great money, yes. But what about everyone else locked into employment with the company? PrettyLittleThing publicly maintain that their garment workers do receive at least minimum wage. However, it has recently been revealed that PLT workers in Leicestershire are on £3.50 per hour. Another campaigner compared this pitiful amount to the £1.42 billion net-worth of Boohoo's CEO, who owns the brand. And that's not the only point of contention for protestors, PLT's environmental sustainability goals are not time-capped, and their climate-change promises empty.

Image: Instagram @venetialamanna

One protestor drew attention to PLT's "Hottest" looks for 2022: Heat waves; intense draughts; loss of species; micro-plastics; wildfires; burning landfills; rising sea levels; and fossils fuels. This is a tall-order, and certainly PLT don't represent the entire fashion industry when it comes to environmental impact. However, brandishing the company at London Fashion Week invited contention. They cannot hide indefinitely from the impact of the brand on sustainability.

They claim to be for "every body" yet they have been outed for multiple cases of horrific labour rights violations

Venetia La Manna, one of the leaders of the protest, sums up the issue perfectly on instagram. 'PrettyLittleThing have built their brand off exploitation. Along with their parent company Boohoo, they harmfully imply that clothing is disposable. They claim to be for "every body" yet they refuse to recognise their unions and have been outed for multiple cases of horrific labour rights violations and sweatshop conditions.'

Image: Instagram @venetialamanna

For PLT, representation for "every body" is limited to their models and directive team. Protestors attempted to represent the workers against these 'Pretty Little Thieves'.

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