University hot takes: From a first, second and third year.

From learning how many trebs I can handle, to realising that it is in fact possible to write 2000 words in one night, my first year as a Newcastle fresher has been full of ups and downs. When I arrived at Newcastle University on the 17th of September, my emotions were conflicted. I was excited to […]

multiple writers
31st May 2022
Image Source: wikimedia commons

From learning how many trebs I can handle, to realising that it is in fact possible to write 2000 words in one night, my first year as a Newcastle fresher has been full of ups and downs.

When I arrived at Newcastle University on the 17th of September, my emotions were conflicted. I was excited to be in a brand-new city, but also nervous to begin a new journey so far from home. But my nerves were quickly settled as my flatmates introduced themselves and suggested a drinking game to start the night off.

Now, eight months on, I will be returning home with new life lessons, memories, and friends. Whilst the most important thing I’ve learnt hasn’t been anything to do with my actual degree, there are many things that I have learnt as a fresher. For example, the fact that Dog and Parrot is quite possibly one of the best places in the world. Or how working for the newspaper is an enjoyable way to procrastinate your degree. T

Whatever it is, this first year has certainly felt like a whirlwind. I’ve laughed more than ever, and also cried more than ever.

Bring on the next two years at Newcastle.

As my second year at university is almost coming to end, I thought I would look back and reflect on how it was.

There is no doubt that my second year has been a lot more interesting and fun than my first year, which was surrounded by Covid-19 lockdowns and online learning, but second year beat by expectations and has become a very much memorable year for me, despite the increased workload.

My second year began with a rerun of freshers, where me any my friends were able to enjoy the clubbing scene and not be confined to having to sit down. The ability to meet more people and experience university to its fullest really has made my second year of uni, along with ability to actively participate in societies, through socials and balls, has really allowed me to appreciate my liver, thought I think my hangxiety has gotten a lot worse. 

The only downside to university has been the strikes, which has limited some of my education, but this has not made me hate uni as being able to do all things that I missed out on in first year has allowed me to thoroughly enjoy this year and make me genuinely excited for my final year. 

If you watch higher education content on social media, you will be well aware of the divide between university and uni. Yes, as far as slang is concerned: university refers to students’ academic commitments, with uni referring to the social side of things.

I mean, if you frowned at the thought of university, you probably share my sentiment – uni is more important, formative and memorable for students, when all is said and done.

Take it from me, a third-year student: even in this intensive stage of study I just know I won’t hold fond memories of any of my study sessions. Not to say that these don’t matter, they just pale in comparison to what really makes a memory: events, nights out, parties, sports matches, coffee dates, shopping trips.

So yes, please take your studies seriously but don’t let that come at the cost of immersing yourself in the social.

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